Promoting Student Innovation in Science and Technology – Viet Tung Dao

This month, the Islands Society is proud to recognize Viet Tung Dao as Local Emerging Leader for excellence in science and technology. As a Hawaii Preparatory Academy junior, Viet Tung Dao received the Special Innovation Prize at the Junior/Senior High School Science Idea Competition at the Tsukuba Science Edge 2016. His project was “Brainwave Technology for Real-Time Driver Drowsiness Detection.” The competition, held March 25 and 26 in Japan, included 60 students from schools throughout Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, Vietnam and the United States competing through presentations showcasing original research and technology ideas. Managing Director of the Pacific Islands Society, Keiko Ono, spoke with Dao about his achievements and aspirations which highlight the value of young people pursuing STEM subjects in Hawaii and the U.S. Pacific Territories.

How did your interest in science begin?

I have had a strong interest in science, especially Physics, since an early age. I really like Physics, it teaches me many useful lessons about things that happen around me. I believe these lessons will become important knowledge that I can apply in my work in the future.

Can you tell us about your winning project and how you came up with the idea?

My project “Brainwave Technology for Real-time Driver Drowsiness Detection” is to develop a system that connects a EEG (Electroencephalogram) headset to smartphone through Bluetooth. This EEG headset will record driver’s brain signals, and when the driver starts feeling drowsy his phone will ring and keep them awake. Moreover, the phone can turn on special music that makes them stay awake; with GPS connection, it can suggest the nearest coffee shop.
Drowsiness is one of the major causes of traffic accidents. In the U.S., drowsy driving is responsible for 100.000 crashes, including 6.000 fatal ones each year. Therefore, I wanted to do this project to save the lives of many people in the U.S, and other countries as well.

What were your thoughts entering the Tsukuba Science Edge event? Has your participation affected your future plans?

It was such an honor to participate and present my project at Tsukuba Science Edge. Tsukuba Science Edge is a big science event where many good projects from around the world were presented. Approximately 100 researchers and industry leaders serve as judges for the event, including Dr. Reona Ezaki. Since it was my first time presenting my project in front of a crowd in a science fair and I believe it was a good experience for me. I also had an opportunity to learn about other students’ projects and made new friends from different countries. Winning “The Innovation Special Prize” award, I am more confident about my independent project. I believe it will be easier for me to intern in a big technology company in the future.

Being chosen by a panel of judges including Dr. Reona Leo Ezaki, a former winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics, at the age of 17 is a testament to your talent. Closer to home, your project advisor Dr. Bill Wecking said that ‘this is the sort of work from students that makes me optimistic about the future’. In what ways do you think young people in Hawaii should be encouraged to create initiatives such as yours?

In my opinion, creating and doing a science project is not that hard. There are many problems that we are facing today, such as global warming, traffic accidents, drug/alcohol abuse, etc. We need to brainstorm and list all the solutions for these problems; then we choose the best one that can solve the problems effectively with a low cost to make a project. The main question is whether the young students in Hawaii are ready to spend much time researching and experimenting – turning this into their passion – and have the willingness to finish it.

What do you think are the main barriers facing young students like yourself in developing more innovative solutions to solve the problems our communities face today? How do you think they can be solved or improved?

I think the most common problem that prevents young students from following their science dream is lack of facility. In order to do a deep research for a project, you need suitable equipment. In my case, because I need to do research on drivers’ brainwave, the tool I use is EPOC+, an EEG headset that can read the user’s brain signals. I know there aren’t many schools in Hawaii that can afford expensive equipment. I am very lucky to do my independent research at HPA Energy Lab, which is a huge building that has all facilities for different study areas. Moreover, to do an independent science project, besides researching on the internet, you should get help from an experienced teacher who has wide knowledge about the area you are studying and who can help you use the research equipment. I would like to thank Dr. Bill, Director of HPA Energy Lab and also my mentor, for guidance and support.

Do you have any innovative ideas you are currently developing which you’d like to develop in the future?

For now, I just want to focus on my driver drowsiness detection project. I may have some ideas to improve the project’s performance in the future.

Finally, what advice would you give to young students like yourself in Hawaii?

I would tell the young students in Hawaii that, “Doing a science project costs much time, so it would be better for you to be ready if you really want to do it. Sometimes, you may feel bored, but when you turn your project into your passion, into your goal, you will love the way you do experiments. You will honor the time you spend doing research, and you will have the willingness to make your project work perfectly.”

 


Local Emerging Leader
Local Emerging Leader

Viet Tung Dao is a junior at Hawaii Preparatory Academy. He received the Special Innovation Prize at the Junior/Senior High School Science Idea Competition at the Tsukuba Science Edge 2016.


The views expressed represent those of the respective contributors. Alternative viewpoints are always welcomed. Please send any responses to pr@islandssociety.org. Our editors will consider any and all responses for future publication.

Image Credit: Eric Horst via Flickr CC

Moving Away From DC: The Power of Local Nonprofits – Keiko Ono

Over the last century, public diplomacy has reinvented itself many times over. Whatever the case may have been in the past, public diplomacy is now widely accepted to include the work of certain nonprofits. At a minimum, it includes those nonprofits whose mission is to bridge the various divides between their local community and those overseas. These nonprofit organizations might even be said to be at the forefront of public diplomacy and cultural relations in the 21st century.

Unfortunately, these nonprofits face a wide range of challenges when engaged in such activities. In the United States, one of the most unfortunate is the pressure to base their operations in Washington, DC. Although there are a number of good reasons why some nonprofits choose to base their operations in the capital, there is no good reason why so many of these nonprofits have done so. We therefore need to take a step back and ask why this is happening.

Consider the 2015 University of Pennsylvania think tank rankings. There, we find that nine of the top twenty international think tanks and nonprofits are based in the United States. And all but two of these organizations are headquartered in Washington D.C. The rankings also reveal that within the United States, sixteen of the top twenty domestic think tanks are based in Washington D.C. While not all of these nonprofits are engaged in public diplomacy and cultural relations, many are.

Why are so many of our nonprofits engaged in public diplomacy and cultural relations are based in the capital?

Let me put forth what seems like one reasonable hypothesis. The geographic concentration of these organizations around the capital might be closely correlated with the lack of support such nonprofits on the periphery often receive from local officials and others in their respective locales. The apparent apathy is concerning. For if local officials are not interested in supporting global initiatives, where can nonprofit organizations with a global focus gain traction? The answer, of course, is Washington, DC.

If this hypothesis holds, does it then follow that this lack of support from local officials really is a problem? In other words, does the concentration of nonprofits around the capital negatively impact American public diplomacy? I believe that it does, for a couple of reasons.

On the one hand, the lack of support from local officials for nonprofits contributing to international issues outside of the capital undermines the very diversity that defines American public diplomacy. If participation in public diplomacy is limited to persons and organizations in a handful of cities, countries – particularly multicultural ones like the United States – risk sacrificing the power of plurality that organizations and communities in the periphery offer.

On the other hand, the saturation of nonprofits with “influence” in international issues also results in narratives and initiatives being tied to the same biases, values, and judgements. This threatens the very diversity upon which strong democracies are built. Without the range of differing opinions nonprofits outside the political loci offer, the country’s capacity for engagement and representation on international decisions is severely limited.

For the past two years, my experience in a leadership role at an international nonprofit seems to support this hypothesis. Our nonprofit’s mission is to respect, inspire, promote, and empower islanders around the world. Since our founding, we have focussed mainly on islanders in the Asia-Pacific. Unfortunately, our organization has found it incredibly difficult to garner any support for our programs from our local officials on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina (where we are based). Despite multiple attempts to reach out to the mayor and the elected members of the town council, we still have yet to receive any support from these local officials. Instead, we have had to rely on the support of national officials, including our elected officials in United States Congress. In practice, this means that we have had to mostly rely on Congressional staff working in Washington, DC.

Of course, I cannot speak for all nonprofits. That would require a major research project – one that I think is long overdue. Instead, I can only speak from my own experience – although I very much doubt that we are the only American nonprofit engaged in public diplomacy and cultural relations to face such challenges.

From those experiences, I think that we desperately need to redress the disconnect that persists between local officials and nonprofits engaged in American public diplomacy and cultural relations, so as to ensure greater representation (and therefore legitimacy) in these fields.

Although local officials will always need to be focused on their immediate surroundings, they must take a step back from what may bring more votes to the ballot box and see the bigger picture. If anything, we must recognize that the boundaries of “local” and the mechanisms by which we measure the impact of our decisions are outdated if we continue to believe they are bound by our respective communities and geographies.

If we want to unlock the power of the periphery in American public diplomacy and cultural relations, local officials need to become champions of local nonprofits with a global focus. In doing so, they will help pave the way for a broader discourse in public diplomacy – one that will ultimately aid in revitalizing the relevance of rural communities in public diplomacy and thus expand civic engagement across the whole country.

If local officials fail to accept this challenge, I believe that the strength and appeal of American public diplomacy and cultural relations will suffer as a result. It is only by creating an environment in which nonprofits engaged in public diplomacy and cultural relations can thrive in local communities around the country that the United States can ever hope to realize the full potential of American public diplomacy and cultural relations. The distance of nonprofits on the periphery from major cities needs to stop being misunderstood as a disadvantage. Instead, it is time for local officials to champion local such nonprofits as a necessary nexus in the ever-shrinking gap between communities around the world.

Note: This article was originally published by the Center on Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California on August 31, 2015.

Pacific Islands Society Taps Vice President to Lead New Corporate Sponsorship Initiative in Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines – 07/31/15

Tokyo, Japan, July 31, 2015 –(PR.com)– Today, the Pacific Islands Society announced that the organization’s Vice President, Keiko Ono, would assume responsibility for leading the recruitment of Japanese, Taiwanese, and Filipino corporate sponsors for the American-based nonprofit.

“Ms. Ono is the logical choice to lead this important initiative in Asia,” says Eddie Walsh, Founder and President of the Pacific Islands Society. “As a member of our senior leadership team, she played a key role in defining our organization’s vision and mission in 2012. She therefore knows exactly what we are looking for in terms of corporate citizenship and environmental sustainability commitments from our corporate sponsors around the world.”

A Japanese citizen based in Tokyo, Ono already provides a local point point of contact for the nonprofit’s members and partners in East Asia.

About the Pacific Islands Society

The Pacific Islands Society is an independent, non-partisan, non-governmental organization that develops and implements projects that inspire and empower Pacific islanders around the world. These projects are currently organized around two main themes: community projects and next generation leaders. PacSoc’s community projects center on nine issue areas, including charity, conservation, democracy, disaster relief, education, equality, health, innovation, and sustainability. PacSoc’s next generation leader projects support artists, athletes, chefs, incubators, musicians, policymakers, storytellers, and technologists. The nonprofit is based on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, United States of America.

Pacific Islands Society Launches IslandsSociety.org – 07/29/15

Hilton Head Island, SC, July 29, 2015 –(PR.com)– The newly redesigned website of the Pacific Islands Society is now live. IslandsSociety.org aims to make it even easier for the nonprofit’s online users to connect with the issues that matter most to Pacific Islander communities. The new website replaces PacificIslandsSociety.org.

“One of the main objectives of the Pacific Islands Society has always been to provide a virtual platform that bridges the geographic boundaries that separate Pacific Islanders around the world,” say Keiko Ono, the Vice President of the Pacific Islands Society. “IslandsSociety.org gives us the integration and functionality that our online users have long requested. It will make it even easier for the islander diaspora to connect with friends and family back home.”

The new website addresses two main areas of concern for the Pacific Islands Society. First, the website’s new design improves usability. Second, the website supports new functionality that will allow the nonprofit to slowly extend the platform as the organization continues to grow.

“We have found that the vast majority of our users access our site using mobile devices,” says Eddie Walsh, the Founder and President of the Pacific Islands Society. “We have therefore tried our best to optimize the site for these users. We hope that they will find the usability of the site has improved dramatically.”

About the Pacific Islands Society (PacSoc)

The Pacific Islands Society is an independent, non-partisan, non-governmental organization that develops and implements projects that inspire and empower Pacific islanders around the world. These projects are currently organized around two main themes: community projects and next generation leaders. PacSoc’s community projects center on nine issue areas, including charity, conservation, democracy, disaster relief, education, equality, health, innovation, and sustainability. PacSoc’s next generation leader projects support artists, athletes, chefs, incubators, musicians, policymakers, storytellers, and technologists.

For more information:

Visit the Pacific Islands Society’s website: www.islandssociety.org

Like the Pacific Islands Society on Facebook: www.facebook.com/PacificIslandsSociety

Follow the Pacific Islands Society on Facebook: http://www.twitter.com/pacislandssoc

Follow the Pacific Islands Society on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/pacific-islands-society

Follow the Pacific Islands Society on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/pacsoc/

Follow the Pacific islands Society on GreatNonprofits: http://greatnonprofits.org/org/pacific-islands-society